DevOps'ish

DevOps, Cloud Native, Open Source, industry news, and the ‘ish between.

153: The week before KubeCon, KubeKhan is back, PodCTL, Microsoft making moves, GitOps, AWS Savings Plans, OpenTitan, Vitess, and more

Note: DevOps’ish will no longer publish an RSS feed. It’s a business decision at this point. Please subscribe via e-mail. Subscribers seem to be the only metric potential sponsors care about. This change should ensure the long term viability of DevOps’ish. Are you ready for KubeCon? I’m not, but I hope to be by end of day Friday. There are a number of events every night (see Events section). If your calendar isn’t booked and you’re looking for something to do, several sponsors are hosting things across San Diego. Read more →

152: UNIX: A History and a Memoir, systemd ~, JEDI, Jaeger, Fitbit, DKIM, Ansible Operators, Quarkus, Img, Podman, Contour, and More

I actually crossed things off my list this week. The little wins should be celebrated along with the big ones. There is something very therapeutic about erasing a line on a whiteboard or checking a box. That’s not celebration enough though. Make sure if you are doing complicated work that you take a moment to celebrate when it all comes together. There’s absolutely nothing wrong with feeling good about yourself. Read more →

151: DevOpsDays Detroit 2019, WeWork woes worsen, AWS should pay OSS devs, Women At Ernst & Young, Tim Cook, Equifax used ‘admin’ as username, & more

Our vacation in Yosemite National Park was amazing. Thanks for sticking around. I jumped out of PTO into DevOpsDays Detroit 2019. It was a great event! My report is linked below. Other news, is that I’m gearing up for Max’s birthday, a potential nerve stimulator, and KubeCon. If you haven’t gotten your tickets and travel for KubeCon sorted yet, do so sooner rather than later (KubeCon discount code below). Happy DevOps’ing out there this week, y’all! Read more →

150: Vacation Mode

The Short family is on vacation. I appreciate you subscribing, reading, and sharing this newsletter. Thank you to those that encouraged me to take some time off. Events All Day DevOps, Live Online November 6, 2019 (24 hours) From your desktop, laptop, or mobile device Free Registration On November 6th, we will be supporting the live online All Day DevOps conference. This is a 24 hour event with 5 simultaneous tracks, delivering 125+ sessions in 38 time zones. Read more →

149: Ahh-Me or Ay-Em-Eye, Don’t stop learning, GitOps, open is better, iTerm2 vuln, Ansible Operators, and More

This week’s introduction is brought to you by Corey Quinn. Send complaints Corey’s way: What’s made of comfy ring-spun cotton, available in your size and shape, AND guaranteed to start a flame war with your AWS pals? The 2019 Last Week in AWS Charity T-Shirt! This year’s shirts come in two flavors — one for each pronunciation of the acronym for Amazon Machine Images. Are you an Ahh-Me or an Ay-Em-Eye? Read more →

148: SysAdvent signup, Corey Quinn isn’t irrelevant, testing in prod, Kubernetes Controllers, VMware Tanzu, and more

The ever-shifting sands of newsletter writing, these are the days of our DevOps’ish… There are no paying sponsors this week. It’s not a problem but, it is a little discouraging. The best part about being a disabled veteran is that I have a funding source for this newsletter until I decide to stop. But, this newsletter does take a significant amount of effort, time, and energy. It’s nice to be compensated for that. Read more →

147: Strategy is hard, the misaligned middle, calling bullshit on Matt Asay, the death of Chef, Docker’s impending doom, AnsibleFest, and more

I used to think of industry analysts as 100% worthless to the broader technology world. After meeting Chris Gardner from Forrester, some of the good folks from RedMonk, and working with Red Hat’s Analyst Relations team, I’ve warmed up to Analysts a little. They serve an important function that a lot of us forget: Tactical efficiency does not replace strategic efficacy… DevOps’ish Last Week’s Top Five Seth Vargo says hell no—puts Chef on ICE The real cost of not wearing makeup at the office DevOps terms: 10 advanced concepts to know 30 Linux Permissions Exercises for Sysadmins On the occasion of leaving Google Alert Automation for your Cloud Infrastructure SPONSORED See the top ten → Read more →

146: Seth Vargo says hell no—puts Chef on ICE, Kubernetes 1.16, Linus Torvalds on kernel development, fluffy clouds, DevOps terms, and more

Just when you thought a toxic, old, white guy with lousy hygiene was going to dominate the news this week, in walks Seth Vargo. On Thursday, Seth Vargo, a former Chef employee, learned something he wasn’t comfortable with about code he’d written. Seth discovered Chef had an active contract with the US Department of Homeland Security’s Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Seth then did something rather extraordinary. He yanked his code (including chef-sugar) from GitHub and RubyGems. Read more →

145: No more Richard Stallman (or his ilk), spying in tech, apps at AWS, Istio 1.13, SSH certificates, Kubernetes issues with iptables, and more

There’s a lot in the newsletter this week; from Istio to intelligence gathering for nation-states. Python 2’s sunset date of 1 Jan 2020 being set is going to have some pretty significant impact. There are also 28 mentions of “Kubernetes” in the source for this week’s newsletter. This week’s DevOps’ish Tweet of the Week can get you a free copy of Kubernetes: Up and Running, Second Edition. Oh and Richard Stallman MUST go. Read more →

144: Your 39 bps matters, happy little hybrid clouds, Kubernetes with a side of service mesh, HA SQLite, and more

This week I read about a study of 17 languages that suggests humans, “no matter how fast or slowly languages are spoken, they tend to send information at about the same rate: 39 bits per second, about twice the speed of Morse code.” The study points out that some languages are clearly “faster” than others but, a steady average rate of 39.15 bits per second (bps) kept coming up. This study fascinated me since I talk to people as part of my work. Read more →