DevOps'ish

DevOps, Cloud Native, Hybrid Cloud, Open Source, industry news, culture, and the ‘ish between.

DevOps’ish 224: Take your time off, Bryan Liles on a mission, John McAfee dead, Dell SupportAssist assisting the wrong people, AWS DNS hijack, Istio 1.10, Intel to make RISC-V chips, and more

Let me be someone to remind you to take some time off (if you can). As a family, we had many lessons learned from not being in our daily routines, setting, or location. This whole month has been a lot of optimizations in our household. All these learned from being outside our sixteen-month grooves. For example, I confirmed I needed glasses after a persistent headache went away then came back when I went back to work. Read more →

DevOps’ish 223: Hostile AWS Free Tier, Bye bye Bezos, InfoSec competencies, Rust in Linux Kernel, Git for Computer Scientists, secrets on the CLI, and more

In vacation mode this week. News reading played second fiddle to having fun. People AWS pricing problems could deter new cloud engineers I was quoted in this piece. I take the same opinion that the AWS Free Tier is indeed user hostile. Not because it’s limited in weird ways but, because new users could be billed thousands and before they know it, it’s too late. Take a deep dive into observability at o11ycon+hnycon, a two-day virtual conference on the future of shipping software. Read more →

DevOps’ish 207: Solarwinds, 4 hour a week Kubernetes maintainer, mischievous Mailchimp, secrets management, Digital Ocean IPO, Sysdig, BOOP, Flux, and More

DevOps’ish is in a state of spring cleaning. First, I’ve found a tool that I like more than Pocket to bookmark and save pages in Raindrop.io. All the Recommended Reads automation is now pulling from Raindrop.io. Then three Zapier rules ferry everything off to the appropriate places. I made that transition midweek. Next is the newsletter service itself. I’ve been unhappy with the current provider ever since doing the never-easy switch from Mailchimp (how forward-thinking that was) to the current provider. Read more →

DevOps’ish 191

As written for my website, a version of which is also here. I woke Sunday morning to some very sad news. We’ve had a tragic loss in the cloud native community. Last weekend we lost Dan Kohn. Dan Kohn is the former Executive Director of Cloud Native Computing Foundation and was leading up COVID-19 response for the Linux Foundation. He passed away after losing his battle with stage four colon cancer. Read more →

DevOps’ish 187

Normally, I don’t like to highlight military uses of Kubernetes (people have feelings about that; I do too, for that matter). But, this week, something rather significant happened out in Utah: U-2 Federal Lab achieves flight with Kubernetes. “The U-2 Federal Laboratory successfully leveraged Kubernetes during a local training sortie on a U-2 Dragon Lady assigned to the 9th Reconnaissance Wing at Beale Air Force Base, Sept. 22. This represents the first time Kubernetes has flown on an operational major weapon system in the Department of Defense. Read more →

146: Seth Vargo says hell no—puts Chef on ICE, Kubernetes 1.16, Linus Torvalds on kernel development, fluffy clouds, DevOps terms, and more

Just when you thought a toxic, old, white guy with lousy hygiene was going to dominate the news this week, in walks Seth Vargo. On Thursday, Seth Vargo, a former Chef employee, learned something he wasn’t comfortable with about code he’d written. Seth discovered Chef had an active contract with the US Department of Homeland Security’s Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Seth then did something rather extraordinary. He yanked his code (including chef-sugar) from GitHub and RubyGems. Read more →

094: Linus Apologizes, Giveaway Winners, Kubernetes, Istio, Dark Debt, Mage, and More

Shortly after DevOps’ish 093 went out last week, Linus Torvalds rocked the Linux kernel development community to its core with his note to LKML, Linux 4.19-rc4 released, an apology, and a maintainership note. In it, Linus apologized, “to the people that my personal behavior hurt and possibly drove away from kernel development entirely.” Also, a Code of Conduct has been adopted by the Linux kernel development community. In my opinion, this is a welcome change. Read more →